LDN

8:10 PM

NYC

3:10 PM

ATL

3:10 PM

SAC

12:10 PM

Industry

Hospitality

Company Size

1-20

Platforms

Web, iOS

Contributions

UX, UI, Illustration

Team Model

Embedded Team Member Backed by the Best of the Best

Industry

Hospitality

Company Size

1-20

Platforms

Web, iOS

Contributions

UX, UI, Illustration

Team Model

Embedded Team Member Backed by the Best of the Best

Industry

Hospitality

Company Size

1-20

Platforms

Web, iOS

Contributions

UX, UI, Illustration

Team Model

Embedded Team Member Backed by the Best of the Best

Industry

Hospitality

Company Size

1-20

Platforms

Web, iOS

Contributions

UX, UI, Illustration

Team Model

Embedded Team Member Backed by the Best of the Best

Project Overview

Project Overview

Project Overview

Project Overview

Peak has a clear vision — to give dining guests more customizable control when they make a reservation, right down to the table where they sit. It’s a simple vision, but a powerful shift in the status quo - the kind of thing Apple prides itself on. We at MF&K knew we could help Peak reach their vision; we just needed Peak to know that.


Before connecting with MF&K, Peak contracted another design team to make their ideas tangible. That team did foundational work in defining the visual tone of Peak. The deep blues, whites, and gold give Peak the air of sophistication they were aiming for. However, the team wasn’t in sync with the stakeholders regarding the full future of Peak, resulting in a tenuous back-and-forth over designs that eroded Peak’s trust in the design team. MF&K knew the only way to deliver the best designs for Peak was to be a trusted partner who works with them to realize the grand vision.


Big idea stakeholders, like Peak's, don't always know what they want to see in the designs until they see it. Perhaps a few elements are clear in their head, but often it’s just a feeling they’re aiming for. Achieving this feeling means realizing the vision for them. When I came onto the Peak project, I could sense that the current designs were not hitting the vision.

Peak has a clear vision — to give dining guests more customizable control when they make a reservation, right down to the table where they sit. It’s a simple vision, but a powerful shift in the status quo - the kind of thing Apple prides itself on. We at MF&K knew we could help Peak reach their vision; we just needed Peak to know that.


Before connecting with MF&K, Peak contracted another design team to make their ideas tangible. That team did foundational work in defining the visual tone of Peak. The deep blues, whites, and gold give Peak the air of sophistication they were aiming for. However, the team wasn’t in sync with the stakeholders regarding the full future of Peak, resulting in a tenuous back-and-forth over designs that eroded Peak’s trust in the design team. MF&K knew the only way to deliver the best designs for Peak was to be a trusted partner who works with them to realize the grand vision.


Big idea stakeholders, like Peak's, don't always know what they want to see in the designs until they see it. Perhaps a few elements are clear in their head, but often it’s just a feeling they’re aiming for. Achieving this feeling means realizing the vision for them. When I came onto the Peak project, I could sense that the current designs were not hitting the vision.

Peak has a clear vision — to give dining guests more customizable control when they make a reservation, right down to the table where they sit. It’s a simple vision, but a powerful shift in the status quo - the kind of thing Apple prides itself on. We at MF&K knew we could help Peak reach their vision; we just needed Peak to know that.


Before connecting with MF&K, Peak contracted another design team to make their ideas tangible. That team did foundational work in defining the visual tone of Peak. The deep blues, whites, and gold give Peak the air of sophistication they were aiming for. However, the team wasn’t in sync with the stakeholders regarding the full future of Peak, resulting in a tenuous back-and-forth over designs that eroded Peak’s trust in the design team. MF&K knew the only way to deliver the best designs for Peak was to be a trusted partner who works with them to realize the grand vision.


Big idea stakeholders, like Peak's, don't always know what they want to see in the designs until they see it. Perhaps a few elements are clear in their head, but often it’s just a feeling they’re aiming for. Achieving this feeling means realizing the vision for them. When I came onto the Peak project, I could sense that the current designs were not hitting the vision.

Peak has a clear vision — to give dining guests more customizable control when they make a reservation, right down to the table where they sit. It’s a simple vision, but a powerful shift in the status quo - the kind of thing Apple prides itself on. We at MF&K knew we could help Peak reach their vision; we just needed Peak to know that.


Before connecting with MF&K, Peak contracted another design team to make their ideas tangible. That team did foundational work in defining the visual tone of Peak. The deep blues, whites, and gold give Peak the air of sophistication they were aiming for. However, the team wasn’t in sync with the stakeholders regarding the full future of Peak, resulting in a tenuous back-and-forth over designs that eroded Peak’s trust in the design team. MF&K knew the only way to deliver the best designs for Peak was to be a trusted partner who works with them to realize the grand vision.


Big idea stakeholders, like Peak's, don't always know what they want to see in the designs until they see it. Perhaps a few elements are clear in their head, but often it’s just a feeling they’re aiming for. Achieving this feeling means realizing the vision for them. When I came onto the Peak project, I could sense that the current designs were not hitting the vision.

The Ask

The Ask

The Ask

The Ask

We were asked to “fix” a data loading issue on the available reservations page. While there were plenty of simple options to chunk out the data, the real struggle was finding the option that felt right for this page. You see, this available reservations page was actually the most important page. It had the restaurant floor plan, one of the elements that the stakeholders knew they wanted. The floor plan was the face of Peak, the key to Peak’s success, the difference between the vision coming to life or dying as a mere dream. We had to tread carefully.

We were asked to “fix” a data loading issue on the available reservations page. While there were plenty of simple options to chunk out the data, the real struggle was finding the option that felt right for this page. You see, this available reservations page was actually the most important page. It had the restaurant floor plan, one of the elements that the stakeholders knew they wanted. The floor plan was the face of Peak, the key to Peak’s success, the difference between the vision coming to life or dying as a mere dream. We had to tread carefully.

We were asked to “fix” a data loading issue on the available reservations page. While there were plenty of simple options to chunk out the data, the real struggle was finding the option that felt right for this page. You see, this available reservations page was actually the most important page. It had the restaurant floor plan, one of the elements that the stakeholders knew they wanted. The floor plan was the face of Peak, the key to Peak’s success, the difference between the vision coming to life or dying as a mere dream. We had to tread carefully.

We were asked to “fix” a data loading issue on the available reservations page. While there were plenty of simple options to chunk out the data, the real struggle was finding the option that felt right for this page. You see, this available reservations page was actually the most important page. It had the restaurant floor plan, one of the elements that the stakeholders knew they wanted. The floor plan was the face of Peak, the key to Peak’s success, the difference between the vision coming to life or dying as a mere dream. We had to tread carefully.

Annotated design: The red comment represents the client’s ask and green represents the things we saw opportunity to fix over time.

Annotated design: The red comment represents the client’s ask and green represents the things we saw opportunity to fix over time.

Annotated design: The red comment represents the client’s ask and green represents the things we saw opportunity to fix over time.

Annotated design: The red comment represents the client’s ask and green represents the things we saw opportunity to fix over time.

At first, we only focused on the fix, showing our research and prototyping to bring these data load options to life. But after the first review, we felt as if we were trying to manicure a single flower when the whole garden needed tending. We stepped back and asked, "What should this page feel like? As a guest looking to make dinner reservations, what would make my interaction easy with this page?”


This perspective made us realize that the most important element was not in the most prominent position. Peak’s key differentiator, the floor plan, was at the bottom of the screen, getting cut off by the fold. But that floor plan was the anchor to the user experience feeling fluid — I want to see exactly which tables I can get, and then decide how much to spend.

At first, we only focused on the fix, showing our research and prototyping to bring these data load options to life. But after the first review, we felt as if we were trying to manicure a single flower when the whole garden needed tending. We stepped back and asked, "What should this page feel like? As a guest looking to make dinner reservations, what would make my interaction easy with this page?”


This perspective made us realize that the most important element was not in the most prominent position. Peak’s key differentiator, the floor plan, was at the bottom of the screen, getting cut off by the fold. But that floor plan was the anchor to the user experience feeling fluid — I want to see exactly which tables I can get, and then decide how much to spend.

At first, we only focused on the fix, showing our research and prototyping to bring these data load options to life. But after the first review, we felt as if we were trying to manicure a single flower when the whole garden needed tending. We stepped back and asked, "What should this page feel like? As a guest looking to make dinner reservations, what would make my interaction easy with this page?”


This perspective made us realize that the most important element was not in the most prominent position. Peak’s key differentiator, the floor plan, was at the bottom of the screen, getting cut off by the fold. But that floor plan was the anchor to the user experience feeling fluid — I want to see exactly which tables I can get, and then decide how much to spend.

At first, we only focused on the fix, showing our research and prototyping to bring these data load options to life. But after the first review, we felt as if we were trying to manicure a single flower when the whole garden needed tending. We stepped back and asked, "What should this page feel like? As a guest looking to make dinner reservations, what would make my interaction easy with this page?”


This perspective made us realize that the most important element was not in the most prominent position. Peak’s key differentiator, the floor plan, was at the bottom of the screen, getting cut off by the fold. But that floor plan was the anchor to the user experience feeling fluid — I want to see exactly which tables I can get, and then decide how much to spend.

Wireframe explorations for how we might solve the discovered issues.

Wireframe explorations for how we might solve the discovered issues.

At the next design review, we presented data-load fix options, but always included suggestions that put the floor plan first to encourage guests to get the table they want. This was the feeling Peak was looking for. As it became clear that the floor plan was the center of everything that felt right, executing the rest of the design on the screen became relatively simple. We continued to present research and prototypes to fine-tune that feeling.


Even though the small loading pattern “fix” ended up becoming a full screen overhaul, Peak was 100% happy with it because we articulated a vision that was only a feeling before. MF&K has been working with Peak for nearly a year at the time of writing, and we have a very close relationship where our designers feel like they’re in-house even when they’re across the country. And that was all built on understanding what the vision should feel like.

At the next design review, we presented data-load fix options, but always included suggestions that put the floor plan first to encourage guests to get the table they want. This was the feeling Peak was looking for. As it became clear that the floor plan was the center of everything that felt right, executing the rest of the design on the screen became relatively simple. We continued to present research and prototypes to fine-tune that feeling.


Even though the small loading pattern “fix” ended up becoming a full screen overhaul, Peak was 100% happy with it because we articulated a vision that was only a feeling before. MF&K has been working with Peak for nearly a year at the time of writing, and we have a very close relationship where our designers feel like they’re in-house even when they’re across the country. And that was all built on understanding what the vision should feel like.

At the next design review, we presented data-load fix options, but always included suggestions that put the floor plan first to encourage guests to get the table they want. This was the feeling Peak was looking for. As it became clear that the floor plan was the center of everything that felt right, executing the rest of the design on the screen became relatively simple. We continued to present research and prototypes to fine-tune that feeling.


Even though the small loading pattern “fix” ended up becoming a full screen overhaul, Peak was 100% happy with it because we articulated a vision that was only a feeling before. MF&K has been working with Peak for nearly a year at the time of writing, and we have a very close relationship where our designers feel like they’re in-house even when they’re across the country. And that was all built on understanding what the vision should feel like.

At the next design review, we presented data-load fix options, but always included suggestions that put the floor plan first to encourage guests to get the table they want. This was the feeling Peak was looking for. As it became clear that the floor plan was the center of everything that felt right, executing the rest of the design on the screen became relatively simple. We continued to present research and prototypes to fine-tune that feeling.


Even though the small loading pattern “fix” ended up becoming a full screen overhaul, Peak was 100% happy with it because we articulated a vision that was only a feeling before. MF&K has been working with Peak for nearly a year at the time of writing, and we have a very close relationship where our designers feel like they’re in-house even when they’re across the country. And that was all built on understanding what the vision should feel like.

The benefit of a large design agency is a wide pool of talent. The benefit of a small design agency is greater control and a more personal touch. What MF&K have done is to give clients like myself the best of both worlds, combining the two concepts into a single collective. In short, MF&K have done spectacular work for us, and I would wholeheartedly recommend them to just about any company at just about any stage of growth.

Noah Glick

Founder, Peak Reservations

The benefit of a large design agency is a wide pool of talent. The benefit of a small design agency is greater control and a more personal touch. What MF&K have done is to give clients like myself the best of both worlds, combining the two concepts into a single collective. In short, MF&K have done spectacular work for us, and I would wholeheartedly recommend them to just about any company at just about any stage of growth.

Noah Glick

Founder, Peak Reservations

The benefit of a large design agency is a wide pool of talent. The benefit of a small design agency is greater control and a more personal touch. What MF&K have done is to give clients like myself the best of both worlds, combining the two concepts into a single collective. In short, MF&K have done spectacular work for us, and I would wholeheartedly recommend them to just about any company at just about any stage of growth.

Noah Glick

Founder, Peak Reservations

The benefit of a large design agency is a wide pool of talent. The benefit of a small design agency is greater control and a more personal touch. What MF&K have done is to give clients like myself the best of both worlds, combining the two concepts into a single collective. In short, MF&K have done spectacular work for us, and I would wholeheartedly recommend them to just about any company at just about any stage of growth.

Noah Glick

Founder, Peak Reservations

MF&K

Let’s chat budget & goals.

hello@mfandk.com

Montgomery, Finlayson & Kenndy Copyright 2023

LDN

8:10 PM

NYC

3:10 PM

ATL

3:10 PM

SAC

12:10 PM

MF&K

Let’s chat budget & goals.

hello@mfandk.com

Montgomery, Finlayson & Kenndy Copyright 2023

MF&K

Let’s chat budget & goals.

hello@mfandk.com

Montgomery, Finlayson & Kenndy Copyright 2023